All About Me Activities

 

All About Me

If you have a child starting out either in school at learning at home, chances are you are looking at activities that are on the topic of ‘all about me’. This topic is a great introduction to learning, because it encourages children to ease into learning with something they’re already an expert on: themselves!

In terms of the Australian curriculum, these activities support expression and development of ideas, language for interaction, and depending on which activities you engage in, evaluative language and vocabulary.

We have several activities to support these areas of the curriculum in our Foundation Brilliant Boxes, but thought we’d give you a few extra activity ideas, here, to have some fun at home with your child.

 

  1. My family hand

Help your child to trace around the outside of their hand, onto a piece of paper. Each finger/thumb is going to represent a different person in their family. (If you have a larger family, just add another hand)

Ask your child to make each finger/thumb into a person in their family – draw on a face, hair, clothing, etc. (TIP: if it’s too tricky with their little hand, maybe have them trace around your larger hand.)

When they have finished creating their ‘hand family’ ask them to tell you one or two words to describe everyone in their family. If they are able to write the words, ask them to write it next to each finger, or they might need your help with this.

Make sure they include themselves!

 

  1. My ‘Me’ book

We’re going to trace around hands again, but this time, do it 10 times and cut out the hands – this is excellent scissor practice! (But little hands do get tired, so you might want to help out – it’s quicker if you can cut through several sheets at once.)

Hole punch a hole at the base of each hand, thread through some ribbon or sting and you have a ‘hand book’.

Make the first hand the ‘cover page’ and have your child write their name on it.

On each of the subsequent hands, ask them to write and/or draw a picture to represent:

  • Their favourite colour
  • Their favourite food
  • Their best memory
  • Their favourite kind of weather
  • Their friends
  • Their favourite toy
  • Their favourite book
  • Something they are really good at
  • Something they want to learn this year

 

  1. Self portrait

This is a great activity for the start of the year. In our Foundation Brilliant Box, we actually provide a little kit of tactile resources for you to create this.

If you don’t have this, you can ask your child to write their name at the top of a piece of paper, then draw a picture of themselves. You may even want to give them a mirror, so they can pay attention to their eye and hair colour, shape of their face, etc. Of course, if you have a huge roll of paper, you could trace around their entire body for a life-size self portrait!

When the masterpiece is complete, ask them to write three words that describes themselves, at the bottom of the picture.

 

  1. My family tree

We’ve created a printable for you to use for this activity, here: Blog printable – family tree

Print out as many pages as you need.

The first page is a big tree, for your child to colour in. The second page has a series of leaves all over it. Ask your child to write the name of each family member on a different leaf, cut them out and paste them onto the tree. I always find it interesting to see who my children include when I say ‘everyone in our family’. They always include our pets and then some of their friends who they consider to be ‘our family’.

As an extension idea, you could make different coloured leaves for siblings, parents, aunts and uncles, cousins and grandparents.

 

  1. The ME flag

Ask your child to imagine they get to create a whole country. They get to decide what they want the country to look like (is it an island? Does it have mountains? Beaches? Deserts? Cities? Farms?)

 

Ask your child the following questions about their country (if they are already writing, they could write these down, or you could just have a conversation about it.)

 

What the name of their country?

What is the weather like?

Which of your friends live there with you?

What kind of plants grow there?

What kind of food do you eat in your country?

What kinds of clothes do people wear?

 

And any other questions you like!

 

Explain that each country has their own flag, with colours and/or pictures to represent that country. It’s probably good to bring up a few examples online, to show them what you mean.

Then, give them an A4 page and tell them that they get to design and colour in a flag for their new country.

 

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